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Ergonomics for retail, convenience store etc.

Many work-related injuries and illnesses experienced by retail store employees are musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), such as sprains or strains that may develop from various factors including lifting, repetitive motion disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome or injuries resulting from overexertion. MSDs may also be caused partly or wholly by factors outside of work. Learning safe ergonomic practices will help prevent musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), loss of mobility and time off the job.

Front End (Check-out, Bagging)
• Position commonly used items such as the cash drawer and printer within easy horizontal reach
• Consider using check stands designed with an adjustable sit/stand or lumbar support against which cashiers can lean
• Remove, round-off or pad sharp or hard edges with which the cashier may come into contact
• Provide footrests for cashiers, alternately resting the feet helps to reduce fatigue, use footrests and anti-fatigue mats in
areas where workers stand for prolonged periods
• Standing on anti-fatigue mats, as compared to bare floors, provides a noticeable improvement in comfort
• Provide sufficient toe space (at least 4 in.) at the bottom of the workstation; toe space allows cashiers to move closer to the
check stand, decreasing reaching requirements
• Place keyboards on supports that adjust in height, horizontal distance and tilt to keep work within the preferred work zone
• Use front facing check stands to reduce twisting motions and extended reaches to the side
• Adjust the check stand height to match the cashier’s waist height, or use a platform
• Place cash register displays at or slightly below eye level

Stocking
• Lift and carry goods close to your body to minimize stress on your lower back
• Use thermal gloves when stocking frozen products as cold temperatures can decrease circulation, causing stress on
your hands; when pricing, use a glove with textured fingertips to wipe frost from frozen foods
• Use knee pads or a stool when stocking lower shelves for long periods of time; this step reduces the
stress on the knees and legs when kneeling
• Use a step stool to reach items on the top of pallets or on high shelves
• Alternate stocking tasks to avoid prolonged kneeling, squatting and overhead
reaching

Disclaimer:

This article is provided solely as a reference tool to be used for information purposes only. The information in this article shall not be construed or interpreted as providing legal or any other advice. The information material does not amend the provisions of any insurance policy issued by CompSource Mutual. It is not a representation that coverage does or does not exist for any particular claim or loss under any such policy. Coverage depends on the facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss, all applicable policy provisions, and any applicable law.

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